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Events

If a program or event you were planning to attend does not appear below, it has been cancelled or postponed.  Please continue to monitor our calendar and website for the most up to date information.  Feel free to contact us with any questions.
Aug
6
Thu
Singing Workers: American Occupational Folk Songs (Online) @ Delaware City Library
Aug 6 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Before modern mass media and widespread literacy, workers in various occupations made their own songs to express their emotions, convey information, tell stories, solidify group identity, and help them make it through the day. Saul Broudy sings the songs of railroad workers, coal miners, farmers, hobos, truck drivers, pilots, and other workers, and discusses the role this music played in the workers’ lives.

Aug
10
Mon
The State of Journalism in Delaware @ Online
Aug 10 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
The State of Journalism in Delaware @ Online

From claims around the United States of “fake news” to the reported “death” of local news, what is the current state of journalism in Delaware?  Hear from a panel of three journalists on the successes and challenges in their field and at their news outlets today.  The panel will be moderated by Nancy Karibjanian, the Director of the Center for Political Communication and a Communications Instructor at the University of Delaware.

Panelists include:

Matt Bittle, Reporter, Delaware State News
Tom Byrne, News Director, Delaware Public Media
Robert Long, Regional Editor of Local News and Visuals, News Journal

This event is part of the “Democracy and the Informed Citizen” initiative.  We thank the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for their generous support of this initiative and the Pulitzer Prizes for their partnership.

The panel will air through Facebook Live.  Visit our Facebook page to watch.  If you would like an email reminder, please complete this form.

Aug
12
Wed
Summer Book Club: ‘Olive Kitteridge’ @ Zoom
Aug 12 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm

REGISTRATION OPEN!

We will be discussing Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout. The first 10 registered attendees will be mailed a free copy of the book. (Books will only be sent to Delaware addresses.)

Those who can obtain their own copy of the book can register as well. People who participate in all three discussions will receive some free swag items from Delaware Humanities!

There will also be an online discussion taking place in our Summer Book Club Facebook group for anyone who is not able to participate in the Zoom discussion.

Follow “@dehumanities” on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to stay up to date on other events.

Book Summary:

At times stern, at other times patient, at times perceptive, at other times in sad denial, Olive Kitteridge, a retired schoolteacher, deplores the changes in her little town and in the world at large, but she doesn’t always recognize the changes in those around her: a lounge musician haunted by a past romance; a former student who has lost the will to live; Olive’s own adult child, who feels tyrannized by her irrational sensitivities; and her husband, Henry, who finds his loyalty to his marriage both a blessing and a curse. As the townspeople grapple with their problems, mild and dire, Olive is brought to a deeper understanding of herself and her life – sometimes painfully, but always with ruthless honesty. Olive Kitteridge offers profound insights into the human condition—its conflicts, its tragedies and joys, and the endurance it requires.

Sep
14
Mon
Fake News, Fraud, and Honest Error (Online) @ Elsmere Library
Sep 14 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am
Fake News, Fraud, and Honest Error (Online) @ Elsmere Library

How do we decide what we believe, and what we don’t believe? Drawing on philosophical, psychological, and legal resources – and avoiding partisan politics – this talk outlines a few of the unconscious factors that influence the way humans reach conclusions and make decisions.

Sep
19
Sat
The Right to Lie @ Bear Library @ Bear Library
Sep 19 @ 11:30 am – 12:30 pm
The Right to Lie @ Bear Library @ Bear Library | Bear | Delaware | United States

In 2016, a federal appeals court struck down an Ohio law that provided penalties for lying during political campaigns. The reason? There is, in fact, a constitutional right to lie. Sure, you can be prosecuted for things like fraud, perjury, and libel, but those are exceptions. In general, constitutional protection for free speech does not depend on whether the speech is true. And when the topic is politics, untruthful speech is not only protected under the First Amendment, but enjoys the highest level of constitutional protection. Why? That’s what this talk is about. For twenty minutes or so, we’ll step back from the fray of partisan politics to take a look at the history and ideas behind our current system. After a brief Q and A, we’ll spend the rest of the program discussing the following questions: Have we, or have we not, reached a point in the history of our country where political lying has so disrupted our electoral system that the public good requires the establishment of legal limits comparable to those placed on perjury? If so, what should such a policy look like, and what unintended consequences might follow?

Oct
10
Sat
Fake News, Fraud, and Honest Error: The Psychology of Belief @ Bear Library @ New Castle County Bear Library
Oct 10 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Fake News, Fraud, and Honest Error: The Psychology of Belief @ Bear Library @ New Castle County Bear Library

How do we decide what we believe, and what we don’t believe? Drawing on philosophical, psychological, and legal resources – and avoiding partisan politics – this talk outlines a few of the unconscious factors that influence the way humans reach conclusions and make decisions.

Oct
21
Wed
2020 Annual Lecture: “Democracy Fix” with Caroline Fredrickson
Oct 21 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

In order to protect our democracy in a time of globally growing authoritarianism, we must engage thoughtfully but with energy in working to strengthen the franchise, fight voter suppression, ensure fair courts and fight for transparency and fairness in our political system.  Caroline Fredrickson, author of The Democracy Fix and Under the Bus, will discuss how these tenets are crucial in keeping the United States’ political system a government that is by the people and for the people.

The lecture will be broadcast through Facebook Live and Zoom. Afterwards, a live Q&A will be moderated by the President of the League of Women Voters of Delaware, Carol Jones.

Registration is requested but not required to view through Facebook live. Please note a Facebook account is not necessary to view the event. Registration is required to join through Zoom.

This program is brought to you in partnership with the Route 9 Library and Innovation Center.  This program is also part of the “Democracy and the Informed Citizen” initiative.  We thank the Andrew Mellon Foundation for their support and the Pulitzer Prizes for their partnership.

Oct
29
Thu
Trek and (Virtual) Talk @ Online
Oct 29 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Join Delaware Humanities and the National Park Service for our first ever Trek and (Virtual) Talk.

First, register for the discussion which will take place virtually on Thursday, October 29 at 6 PM.

After you register, you will be emailed readings related to nature and the environment.  The readings will focus on topics such as bats, shad, invasive species, Piedmont geology, pollinators, wetlands, waterbirds/migration, and amphibians and reptiles.  We encourage you to take these readings on the trail with you prior to the virtual event on October 29th. The readings were inspired by the scenic trails and Brandywine Creek vistas in the Brandywine Valley unit of the First State National Historical Park; however, if you can’t make it to these trails, you can hike and read on any trail or in any green space closest to you, or anywhere that you enjoy nature.

On Thursday, October 29 at 6 PM, we will discuss 3-4 of the readings and your reflections with Environmental Humanities professor Lisa Dill and park staff.

Nov
14
Sat
We Have Been Here Before: Delmarva During the 1918 Pandemic (online) @ Zoom
Nov 14 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

This program examines the impact of the so-called Spanish Influenza Pandemic of 1918 on Delmarva and nearby points. The virus took a grim toll on the Delmarva region, and it overwhelmed the health care system, forcing the region to shut down for an extended period. Although they didn’t call it social distancing at the top of the twentieth century, the methods they used to quarantine the contagion are similar to what we practice today. Thus, as the world struggles with the novel COVID-19 contagion, we will take a relevant look at the past to see how people in the region 102-years ago managed a similar situation, at a time when medical science did not have a treatment for the pathogen.

Nov
23
Mon
The Lincolns: Portrait of a Family (online) @ Zoom
Nov 23 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Abraham Lincoln and Mary Todd, who met in 1839 and married in 1842, seemed at first glance to have nothing in common. Yet, they made a marriage that was probably one of the most consequential in American history, as they came to the White House in the midst of the country’s greatest crisis. This talk will look back at this improbable pair, their four sons, and the heartbreaking series of tragedies that struck the family before, during, and after the Civil War.