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Events

If a program or event you were planning to attend does not appear below, it has been cancelled or postponed.  Please continue to monitor our calendar and website for the most up to date information.  Feel free to contact us with any questions.
Feb
4
Thu
We Have Been Here Before: Delmarva During the 1918 Pandemic @ Online
Feb 4 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm
Feb
6
Sat
Singing Workers: American Occupational Folk Songs @ Online (Zoom)
Feb 6 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Feb
10
Wed
History’s Mysteries: Weekly Online Reading @ Online
Feb 10 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Join for a weekly reading of a chapter of Delaware Humanities “History’s Mysteries”. Follow Denisha, Titus, and Angelo as they travel through Delaware and through time, solving mysteries and learning about the First State along the way.  Then ask the author, illustrators, and/or reader any questions you may have!

Miss a week?  We will post the chapter text and video after each reading weekly.  We will also do a quick recap at the start of each session.

All events take place Wednesdays at noon. Use the link to register for one event or all seven.

February 10: Prologue by David Teague, read by the author

February 17: Chapter 1 “WWII Watchtowers” by John Micklos, read by the author; also meet illustrator Ara Atkinson-Skinner

February 24: Chapter 2 “On the Nanticoke River” by Mary Pauer, read by Beth Wasden (Nanticoke Watershed Alliance Volunteer and Outreach Coordinator)

March 3: Chapter 3 “Annie Jump Cannon” by Kari Ann Ebert, read by author; also meet illustrator Sidney Rae Moore

March 10: Chapter 4 “Private Horace Dickens” by Heather Janas, read by author; also meet illustrator Samantha Gibbs

March 17: Chapter 5 “The Amstel House” by Mark Lowther, read by Karen Janus (New Castle Historical Society Public Programs Manager); also meet illustrator Ara Atkinson-Skinner

March 24: Chapter 6 “The Secret of the Helmet” by Billie Travalini, read by the author; also meet illustrator Sidney Rae Moore; “Conclusion” by David Teague, read by author

Prohibited Winter Book Club: Beloved @ Online
Feb 10 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm

“Freeing yourself was one thing; claiming ownership of that freed self was another.”

Sethe was born a slave and through a perilous journey escaped to Ohio.   Eighteen years later, living in her own home with her daughter Denver in a post-Civil War America, Sethe is still not free.  She is haunted, figuratively and literally, by her past.  Just when things begin to change, potentially for the better, a mysterious teenager shows up on Sethe’s porch, calling herself by the one word Sethe could afford to put on her dead daughter’s tombstone…Beloved.  Toni Morrison’s banned magic realism classic, Beloved (1987), is a powerful look at love, loss, freedom, good, and evil.

 

Feb
11
Thu
Downtown Dover Poetry Weekend Virtual Reception with Poet Aimee Nezhukumatathil
Feb 11 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

 

Virtual reception & poetry reading featuring award-winning poet, essayist & non-fiction writer, Aimee Nezhukumatathil.

About this DE Humanities Grant Event

Join us as we honor the winner and finalists of the Downtown Dover Poetry Weekend Ekphrastic Poetry Contest followed by a poetry reading by New York Times bestselling author Aimee Nezhukumatathil.

Aimee Nezhukumatathil is the author of a book of nature essays, World of Wonders: In Praise of Fireflies, Whale Sharks, & Other Astonishments, which was named a finalist for the Kirkus Prize in non-fiction, and four award-winning poetry collections, most recently, Oceanic (2018). Awards for her writing include fellowships from the Mississippi Arts Council, Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters Award for poetry, National Endowment of the Arts, and the Guggenheim Foundation. Her writing has appeared in NYTimes Magazine, ESPN, and Best American Poetry. She is professor of English and Creative Writing in the University of Mississippi’s MFA program. View her full bio and learn more about her writing, including where to purchase her books, on her website .

Register via Eventbrite here

Feb
17
Wed
History’s Mysteries: Weekly Online Reading @ Online
Feb 17 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Join for a weekly reading of a chapter of Delaware Humanities “History’s Mysteries”. Follow Denisha, Titus, and Angelo as they travel through Delaware and through time, solving mysteries and learning about the First State along the way.  Then ask the author, illustrators, and/or reader any questions you may have!

Miss a week?  We will post the chapter text and video after each reading weekly.  We will also do a quick recap at the start of each session.

All events take place Wednesdays at noon. Use the link to register for one event or all seven.

February 10: Prologue by David Teague, read by the author

February 17: Chapter 1 “WWII Watchtowers” by John Micklos, read by the author; also meet illustrator Ara Atkinson-Skinner

February 24: Chapter 2 “On the Nanticoke River” by Mary Pauer, read by Beth Wasden (Nanticoke Watershed Alliance Volunteer and Outreach Coordinator)

March 3: Chapter 3 “Annie Jump Cannon” by Kari Ann Ebert, read by author; also meet illustrator Sidney Rae Moore

March 10: Chapter 4 “Private Horace Dickens” by Heather Janas, read by author; also meet illustrator Samantha Gibbs

March 17: Chapter 5 “The Amstel House” by Mark Lowther, read by Karen Janus (New Castle Historical Society Public Programs Manager); also meet illustrator Ara Atkinson-Skinner

March 24: Chapter 6 “The Secret of the Helmet” by Billie Travalini, read by the author; also meet illustrator Sidney Rae Moore; “Conclusion” by David Teague, read by author

The Global State of Democracy @ Online
Feb 17 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Democracy advocates, human rights activists, and scholars alike have argued that democracy is in peril around the world. Countries that once seemed like shining democratic success stories, seem to be regressing into authoritarianism. Once stable and thriving democracies are now having to address dissatisfied citizens and sharp increases in populism, nationalism, and civil unrest. Economic inequality, social instability, distrust of elites, and anxiety about the unprecedented threat to global public health posed by the COVID-19 pandemic are leaving many people in the global community unhappy with how democracy is working for them. This panel will consider the state of democracy in various countries around the world, issues that imperil democracy in those regions, and how the pandemic has created a range of new challenges to democratic freedom.

Panelists include Luísa Torres (University of Delaware), John Knaus (National Endowment for Democracy), Michael Kugelman (Wilson Center), and Patrick Stephenson (Imani Centre for Policy and Education).  The panel will be moderated by Justin Collier (“Why It Matters” Project Scholar and PhD candidate from the Political Science and International Relations Department in the University of Delaware).

Feb
18
Thu
“How to Rig an Election” Book Discussion @ Online
Feb 18 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

There are more elections than ever before, and yet the world is becoming less democratic. This is the primary paradox presented by the authors of How to Rig an Election. Nic Cheeseman and Brian Klaas, two political scientists and preeminent experts on democracy and elections, examine how authoritarian leaders can gain and maintain political power by taking advantage of weaknesses in electoral systems. Using data collected from more than 500 interviews in 11 countries as well as a global data set of every elections held over the past 60 years, the authors lay out how gerrymandering, vote buying, repression, hacking, and ballot box stuffing are used by autocrats to ‘rig elections’ and what can be done to protect democracies.

This book discussion focuses primarily on the book and on the global state of democracy more generally. Leading the discussion is Justin Collier, PhD candidate in the Department of Political Science and International Relations at the University of Delaware. His research includes public diplomacy, nationalism, national identity, and ethnic conflict. The first 15 registrants from the Lewes, Delaware area to sign up can pick up a free copy of the book from the library.

NOTE: this meeting is being conducted through Zoom. You MUST REGISTER to receive instructions for joining the meeting.

If you have need assistance with registration or getting your Zoom invitation, please email the Lewes Public Library.

Basic written instructions for using Zoom may be found here and a brief video tutorial may be found here.

This program is hosted by the Lewes Public Library and is funded by the “Why It Matters” initiative, administered by the Federation of State Humanities Councils and funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Feb
24
Wed
History’s Mysteries: Weekly Online Reading @ Online
Feb 24 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Join for a weekly reading of a chapter of Delaware Humanities “History’s Mysteries”. Follow Denisha, Titus, and Angelo as they travel through Delaware and through time, solving mysteries and learning about the First State along the way.  Then ask the author, illustrators, and/or reader any questions you may have!

Miss a week?  We will post the chapter text and video after each reading weekly.  We will also do a quick recap at the start of each session.

All events take place Wednesdays at noon. Use the link to register for one event or all seven.

February 10: Prologue by David Teague, read by the author

February 17: Chapter 1 “WWII Watchtowers” by John Micklos, read by the author; also meet illustrator Ara Atkinson-Skinner

February 24: Chapter 2 “On the Nanticoke River” by Mary Pauer, read by Beth Wasden (Nanticoke Watershed Alliance Volunteer and Outreach Coordinator)

March 3: Chapter 3 “Annie Jump Cannon” by Kari Ann Ebert, read by author; also meet illustrator Sidney Rae Moore

March 10: Chapter 4 “Private Horace Dickens” by Heather Janas, read by author; also meet illustrator Samantha Gibbs

March 17: Chapter 5 “The Amstel House” by Mark Lowther, read by Karen Janus (New Castle Historical Society Public Programs Manager); also meet illustrator Ara Atkinson-Skinner

March 24: Chapter 6 “The Secret of the Helmet” by Billie Travalini, read by the author; also meet illustrator Sidney Rae Moore; “Conclusion” by David Teague, read by author

Dr. Wesley Memeger, Jr: Science into Art Vision Grant event @ The Hagley Foundation
Feb 24 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Dr. Wesley Memeger

 

On Wednesday, February 24, Hagley will premiere a new documentary chronicling the life of Dr. Wesley Memeger, Jr. Memeger, a long-time DuPont chemist at the Pioneering Research Laboratory, who played a crucial role in streamlining the production of Kevlar by discovering a faster polymerization process. Memeger holds fourteen patents for his discoveries. In addition, he is an accomplished artist, taking inspiration from the geometric shapes found in molecular compounds.

The 40-minute documentary will premiere on YouTube at 7 p.m. on February 24th (link will be available here prior to the event) and will be hosted by Dr. Jeanne Nutter, Professor of Media Communications at Bloomfield College and an award-winning oral historian.